Does Grain-Free Dog Food Really Lead to DCM?

At the Barkery, we are committed to the overall health of our customer’s pets, and making sure all our food lines are nutritious, healthy, and safe. That’s why we thought an update on the status of DCM was necessary. On November 3, 2020, Dr. Steven Solomon, Director of the Food & Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Veterinary Medicine, released the much-needed clarity on the causes of non- hereditary Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM).

In the article released Dr. Solomon emphasizes the following points:

No pet food has been declared unsafe or linked to DCM:

  • “FDA has not taken regulatory action against or declared any specific pet food products unsafe or definitively linked to DCM. As the scientific community looks further into the role that diet may play in these cases, we hope to explore additional avenues about ingredient levels, nutrient bioavailability, ingredient sourcing, and diet processing to determine if there are any common factors. We have asked pet food manufacturers to share diet formulation information, which could substantially benefit our understanding of the role of diet,” Solomon wrote.

DCM is a complex medical condition about far more than diet:

  • “Historically, DCM has been primarily linked to genetic predisposition in certain breeds, but in the context of these atypical cases, emerging science appears to indicate that non-hereditary DCM is a complex medical condition that may be affected by the interplay of multiple factors such as genetics, underlying medical conditions, and diet.” Dr. Solomon wrote.

We are optimistic that all who questioned the safety & benefits of grain-free regain their confidence in these foods, and that the industry will continue to make high quality pet foods in the best interest of pet health. We hope that you continue to trust us as mutual pet lovers to put forth our best research and thinking, so that we can all gain a fuller understanding of non-hereditary DCM.

To read FDA’s full report click the links below