Spring Cleaning for your Pup!

With spring arriving and rain to come soon, we’ve got great products to keep your dog and your house clean!

Stop in and check out our wide variety of items:

  • The Paw Wash and Paw Plunge – no more ruining nice towels and clean floors with muddy paws!
  • The Soggy Doggy – a mat perfect for wet dogs that absorbs all the moisture
  • Pocket Full of Baths – Pay for 10 baths up front, get the 11th free, plus 10x points!
  • Several Shampoos and Scented Sprays
  • Safe Cleaning Sprays
  • Self-serve and Full-serve Baths on site
  • Skilled Groomers

Come in and treat your four-legged friend to a bath and stock up while you’re here – you’ll be glad you did!

 

 

 

Litterbox Solutions

You’ve come home to an unwanted “surprise” – but this time the culprit is the cat.

Why isn’t he using the litterbox? It could be a number of reasons. And unlike a dog, punishing a cat by rubbing his face in the mess is not the answer.

21cats.org shared an article on this very problem with Pet360. Here are some behavioral reasons to consider:

  • Litterbox is too dirty to use. Cats are very clean and if the box is dirty they will find another place to go.
  • Litterbox is in too high traffic of a place. Cats won’t go to the bathroom in a place that is loud or congested, so keep your box somewhere that is quiet and calm.
  • Litterbox is too small/large. Your cat’s box should be large enough (not too large) for your cat to stand in and move around and the litter should be no more than a few inches deep.
  • The litter itself isn’t of your cat’s liking. Yes cats can have litter preferences and some of these start when the cat is young. When you get your pet check what the pet store, or shelter is using as litter and continue using that type. Also don’t get into the practice of continually switching brands and types of litter, this may throw off your cat’s routine and confuse your cat as to where to go to the bathroom.
  • Your cat has recently been declawed. A newly declawed cat will not like the feeling of litter on his/her paws and may thus avoid the litterbox altogether.
  • Litterbox is too close to food or water. Cats will not eat and go to the bathroom in the same place, so keep these two areas separate.
  • Litterbox doesn’t have 2 easy escape routes. Cats like to be able to see two clear directions of escape while in the litterbox, this is an instinctual feeling stemming from not wanting to be ‘snuck up on’ at an inopportune time.
  • Other cats also use this litterbox (in a multiple cat home) and your cat wants his own box. As a general rule you should have at least one box for each cat in your home.
  • Your cat is marking to exhibit his/her dominance in the home. This can happen when a new cat is brought into the house or your cat is being treated against the natural cat hierarchy in the house.
  • A stressful situation has occurred in your cat’s life such as a move to a new home or a new child or cat being brought into the home. In this case you may also need to retrain your cat to go to the box.

There are several other things to consider when it comes to this issue. You can read more by clicking here.

 

Barkery Owner Delena Stout – KC’s Most Influential Women

We’re proud to announce that Barkery Owner Delena Stout has been named one of KC’s Most Influential Women by KC Magazine!

According to Susan Fotovich McCabe, ” This year’s Influential Women honorees are not only driven to succeed at their own companies, they’re setting the standard for future generations of female leaders in KC. Diversity is the best word to describe our 2014 class of Influential Women. Representing a wide array of industries, including sales, marketing, law, nonprofit and more, these 31 women all have one thing in common: passion.”

It’s true: Delena Stout had both passion and determination when she began developing her plan for a place many pet lovers have come to love: The Brookside Barkery and Bath.

It all started when, “after working several years in the corporate world, Stout found herself as a displaced worker. She did her homework, participated in the Kauffman Foundation’s FastTrac New Venture program and began baking dog treats in the basement of a tiny Brookside storefront while sleeping on a cot next to the oven. It makes for fond memories, but building a large, loyal base of customers is what really puts a smile on her face.” That base was extended when a second location was opened in Lee’s Summit.

Not only did Delena achieve her dream goal of a mutli-faceted dog owner destination, she also thrives on the ability to donate to charities that care for and also hold weekly adoptions in both stores. She is also looking forward to opening a third location in Overland Park later this year.

Read more from the KC Magazine article by clicking here.

Exercise is Key for Dog Health

In an article from Dog Training Central titled “The Importance of Exercising Your Dog,” the author notes that exercise helps dog and humans alike.

Exercise is beneficial for dogs of all ages, as long as you adjust the amount of exercise to suit your dog’s age and fitness level. Not only are the physical benefits, but also mental.

“A dog that doesn’t get enough exercise will not only run the risk of developing health issues such as obesity, heart disease and arthritis, he will also develop various behavioral issues. Lack of exercise results in boredom and frustration, the dog may try to deal with these feelings by developing destructive patterns of behavior such as aggression and destructive behaviors such as excessive barking, digging and escaping.”

The author notes that a dog that isn’t allowed to work off excess energy and tension through exercise may develop aggressive tendencies and goes on to say that boredom will lead the dog to try to entertain himself with stress relieving behavior such as chewing.

Regular exercise is key for a happy, healthy and long life. A backyard can be helpful for activity, though you should ideally take your dog out for daily walks. Walking your dog daily will benefit both you and your dog. This also helps dogs to become more socialized and accepting of new situations and environments which helps build confidence.

Some pet owners can jog with their dog or train their dogs to jog next to them while they’re cycling. You should only attempt to do this if your dog is physically fit enough to handle vigorous exercise. Swimming is another activity you can do with your dog; most dogs love to swim once they’ve tried it a few times. Dogs are natural swimmers and it shouldn’t take long for your dog to enjoy regular swims with you. There are special life jackets for safety designed just for dogs that you can purchase.  And of course, a good ol’ game of fetch is another great way to exercise your dog.

“The key to an effective exercise program is regularity; try to maintain aregular exercise schedule for your dog. Giving your dog regular exercise is one of the best things you can do for him and will help him live a healthier and happier life. Remember to make sure you consider your dog’s fur coat and the hot sun too. Your vet will be able to give you the best advice on how much exercise and temperature changes your dog can handle according to his age, breed and level of health.”

The Best Breeds for Busy Families

You’re busy. Between you, your spouse and the kids, it seems there’s always something going on, or somewhere to be. But if you’re ready to add a dog to your family, you’ll want to make sure to pick the right breed. An adaptable, laid back pup that’s willing to learn from (and connect with) each family member can ensure your dog gets the proper care it needs while giving kids a wonderful chance to learn some responsibility.

Spokesperson Lisa Peterson of the American Kennel Club says, “Dogs require care 24/7, so there are many opportunities for families to get involved in their dog’s life, from family walks to learning how to teach different behaviors at a training class. They benefit from consistent and patient involvement from all family members.”

Here are Peterson’s breed picks for busy families:

  • French Bulldog
  • Pug
  • Basset Hound
  • Golden Retriever
  • Corgi
  • Boston Terrier
  • Clumber Spaniel
  • Greyhound
  • Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
  • Toy Fox Terrier

You can read more about each specific breed by clicking here

 

Canine Cans

Did you just become a new dog owner? Have a friend who just adopted a pup?

Canine Cans are the perfect start for new dogs!

A $75 value, our Canine Cans are just $14.99 and are loaded with Barkery coupons good for:

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  • One free self-serve pet wash
  • One free nutritional consultation
  • One free pet ID tag
  • One free nail trim
  • One free small bag of food
  • One free tooth brushing
  • $5 off any pet accessory

Even if you’re a long-time pet owner and have just discovered the Barkery, this is the perfect way to try our services and get your pet off on the right foot–er– paw! Stop in today and pick one up!

Is Your Cat Allergic to Her Food?

Your cat has developed a red sore on her back – could food could be causing it?

Cat Channel guest author Arnold Plotnick, DVM, notes that, “Many cats with skin allergies will develop a large circular red sore on their back, often right in the middle of their back in the shoulder blade area. Often, the sore will ooze a little serum, and it can sometimes become infected. These are similar to “hot spots” that commonly develop in dogs.”

A few things can cause them:

  • Inflammatory or Auto-Immune Condition Anti-inflammatory medication — steroids such as prednisolone, a synthetic version of cortisone — often cause the sore to resolve. I personally prefer to prescribe tablets rather a steroid injection, as I feel it is safer. Steroids didn’t work, so an inflammatory or an auto-immune condition seems unlikely.
  • Bacterial Infection If a secondary bacterial infection develops, it might need antibiotics. Antibiotics didn’t work, so an infection is unlikely.
  • Flea Allergy Cat flea allergy can certainly cause scabs throughout your cat’s skin, but usually doesn’t cause a persistent open sore. Flea treatment didn’t help, so fleas are unlikely to be the cause.
  • Food Allergy Cat food allergy can present in a variety of ways, although a persistent sore is not your typical presentation. I’m surprised that the steroid injections had no effect. The next step is to determine whether your cat has a food allergy.

How to Determine Whether Your Cat Has Food Allergies
•    Start a hypoallergenic diet. A hypoallergenic diet contains a protein source that your cat has not been exposed to before, such as rabbit, venison or duck. (Most veterinarians carry prescription diets designed for this purpose.)
•    Feed this food, and ONLY this diet, for up to 10 weeks, before concluding whether or not food allergy is the culprit.
•    Alternatively, you may opt for a skin biopsy. This simple procedure will very likely reveal the diagnosis.

Read more from this article by clicking here